Ep. 126 – How to help patients with skin issues (even if you’re not a wound care PT)

Podcast episode graphic: background of laptop & stethoscope, foreground of white box with text: Ep. 126 How to help patients with skin issues (even if you're not a wound care PT).  Teal box with photo of wound care supplies on top.  TheOncoPT Logo.

I hated wound care in PT school. Didn’t ever pique my interest. So when I went into OncoPT, I told myself I wouldn’t be seeing patients with wounds.

WRONG.

My very first solo eval had severe radiation burns – guess what? A wound. And just one of many I have seen so far in my career.

We will see wounds in OncoPT. So even if we’re not wound care PTs, we still need to know what to do with these patients.

Here’s how we can help patients with wounds/skin care issues (even if we’re not exactly wound care PTs):

  • Check for skin issues
  • Educate patients on potential skin issues & what to look out for
  • Educate patients to adhere to their skin plan of care
  • Make sure garments/other things aren’t exacerbating current skin issues (bras!)
    • Check out AnaOno Bras – one of my personal favorites is the Monica bra (affiliate link).
  • Get patients connect with the right practitioners
  • BONUS: check out Aubrene Fiore’s presentation on Wounds & Skin Care at the Virtual Oncology Physical Therapy Summit (affiliate link here) – you can still get access until April 2022 with your ticket!

5 Things to Know About Writing Your Case Report

 laptop & stethoscope.  Front blue square with overlay image of person typing on laptop

The case report is part of the initial application process for the oncology specialist certification exam, but boy is it a doozy.

It’s critical to plan for success, so here’s 5 things you MUST know about writing your case report.

It has to be done & submitted by July 1 deadline (for 2022 exam).

Get it done!

Be intentional with your time.

It’s easy to spend a lot of hours doing not a lot of really beneficial work.

You may be asked to do revisions.

This is no big deal. Truly. Most of the people I’ve talked to who sat for the exam in 2021 had to do revisions.

It helps you get in the exam preparation mindset.

The exam is entirely case-based.

It’s a really big accomplishment.

Yea. You did it!


Ready to write your case report or know you’ll need to?

Stop stressing over it. Start actually writing. Get it done:

Register for TheOncoPT Case Report Crash Course. Registration for the live course ends Thursday, April 29 at 12:00pm Central Time.

Ep. 124 – How to apply for the oncology specialist certification exam

Podcast graphic image: laptop in background, white square foreground with caption: Ep. 124 - How to apply for the oncology specialist certification exam.  TheOncoPT logo.  Blue square with image of laptop & pen in the center.

The deadline for the oncology specialist certification exam is rapidly approaching (July 1!), so don’t let it sneak up on you!

In today’s episode, we’re covering important dates to know, plus a step-by-step walkthrough of how to complete the application.

Starting from scratch? In tonight’s workshop, we’re taking you through our foolproof method to start your case report with success: picking your “perfect” patient. See you tonight at 6:30pm Central Time!

Important dates:

Deadline to apply (& submit your case report): July 1, 2021.

Initial Certification Exam Fee Deadline: November 30, 2021.

Scheduling permits issued in late December

Exam dates: February 26 – March 12, 2022.

Documenting your PT experience

Two options:

Option A: submit evidence of 2,000 hours of direct patient care as licensed US PT in specialty area

Option B: submit evidence of completion of oncology residency

2000 hours of direct patient care in specific specialty area last 10 years

500 hours of direct patient care in specific specialty area within last 3 years

Your PT experience has to be approved by someone who can vouch that you’ve done your hours, for example: manager, supervisor, coworker, etc.

Oncology Case Report

When you apply, you must submit your completed case report by the July 1 deadline.

If you want more help on this, I highly encourage you to check out our workshop tonight on “How to pick the ‘perfect’ patient for your case report.”

In this workshop, we’ll show you our foolproof ways to start your case report for success, plus pull back the curtain on our new mini-course, TheOncoPT Case Report Crash Course. See you inside!

Ep. 123 – But what about prehab?

The 4-part formula for star assessments works great – until you get a patient without any problems or impairments. So how the heck do you write a star assessment without a problem sentence???

I’m covering exactly this in today’s episode (thanks to my listeners who messaged me with this exact question!). Missed the 4-part formula in last week’s episode? Listen here.

Step one: screen.

  • What treatments are planned? What are some common impairments of these treatments? Screen.
  • Templates for different diagnosis: cues yourself for common impairments

Step two: educate.

  • Empower your patients on what to look out for & when to return.

Did you hear The Virtual Oncology Physical Therapy Summit now has CEUs?!?!

Grab your seat today, & get access for 365 days!

Ep. 122 – Nail your OncoPT assessments every time

Oncology PT is rarely like outpatient orthopedic PT.  Pts often aren’t seen for 2-3x/week for 6 weeks & discharged.  Some are, but the vast majority don’t fit into this neat box.  In fact, they may need months of skilled PT services & ongoing check-ups, depending on their functional mobility impairments.  So how do we make sure our patients get the appropriate care they need?  Rock solid, star assessments that demonstrate exactly what they need & how you are going to provide these services.  

Without these assessments, we are not showing our worth to referring providers, third-party payors, & others who need to know.  These assessments & then subsequent skilled PT services that result in improvements or maintenance of function show exactly how we are positively affecting these patients.  There are many ways to write a great assessment; there’s also some really bad assessments out there.  Finding your own way to write a star assessment is critical.  It can be easy to get lost in a rabbit hole chasing the perfect assessment, so I’ve created my formula that you can copy & paste into your evaluations to nail it each & every time.

Pt is a 35 y/o female referred to PT for balance & neuropathy problems, secondary to undergoing AC/T chemotherapy for her Stage III breast cancer.  She demonstrates impaired balance, decreased overall strength, & complaints of neuropathy in her hands & feet, leading to difficulty mowing her yard, playing with her children, running for exercise, & doing yoga.  Pt will benefit from skilled PT services to address the aforementioned impairments & improve her ability to participate in a community exercise program for long-term wellness.  Pt verbalized good understanding of today’s eval findings, benefits of physical activity for long-term wellness after a cancer diagnosis, potential chronic side effects of chemotherapy, & to call with questions or concerns.  Pt was provided with a basic standing balance program for HEP, verbalized understanding of safe home performance to reduce fall risk.  

Intro.  Problem sentence.  Benefits/limiters/facilitators.  Patient response.    

Let’s do another one:

Pt demonstrates moderate RUE swelling, palpable cording in R axilla, complaints of R upper quarter pain, leading to difficulty independently managing his chronic lymphedema condition, reaching upper kitchen cabinets, & participating in woodworking hobby.  Pt will benefit from skilled PT services to address the aforementioned impairments & to reduce risk of lymphedema-related infection.  Pt may be limited by chronicity of impairments & progressive nature of lymphedema but is highly motivated to improve functional mobility & has supportive family members.  Pt verbalized good understanding of today’s eval findings, decongestive exercise HEP, & to call with questions or concerns.  

Intro.  Problem sentence.  Benefits/limiters/facilitators.  Patient response.    

With these four pieces to your assessment formula, you’re sure to be writing star assessments in no time.  So for your action step, think of a patient you’ve seen recently.  Use my formula to create your own star assessment.  After you’re done, you can use this as a template for your evaluations.  


Did you hear The Virtual Oncology Physical Therapy Summit now has CEUs?!?! Grab your seat today, & get access for 365 days!